I worry a great deal about the shape of my days.

This worry is a symptom of privilege. It means I have choices. For the most part, my days are not ruled by desperate necessity.

Instead, each one of my days unrolls like a red carpet. It is a carpet woven with hundreds of tiny choices. First, what should I feed the baby for breakfast? Next, should I spend this hour playing Candyland with the four-year-old or cleaning the kitchen? Then, should I read a book while the baby naps or try to write something? Until, should I spend the evening balancing the checkbook or watching PBS with Jonathan?

Choice after beautiful choice until my day is spent, and I lie in bed wondering where the hours fled. What did I accomplish today? Why did I never manage to send those emails? How could I have forgotten to do the grocery shopping / take that book back to the library / return that phone call / schedule that appointment?

Worry. Guilt. A resolve to do better tomorrow but never quite sure what tomorrow should look like. This is the blessing and the burden of choice.

I am an overly sensitive, introverted person. I require a great deal of space in my days: time for sitting and thinking. Time for sitting and reading. Time for taking that walk, pulling the baby behind me in her sled. Never enough time for cooking or cleaning or whatever else it is I’m supposed to be doing in my life as wife and mother.

Which means, I rarely do anything without guilt. Guilt says, shouldn’t you be doing more / working harder / accomplishing bigger?

 

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(photo by yours truly)

 

I don’t think this is only a problem for mothers at home with small children. I can remember breaking out in hives from the stress of life as a college student. My life is more complicated now, but I have, at least, learned to avoid that kind of strain. I have learned, at least, to let myself live slowly, even if the price I pay is no longer hives but a constant, low-level guilt.

I want to be done with guilt. I want to believe that my most important job, the most critical task, requires space. It requires quiet. It requires rest.

The most important item on my daily list is always this: to be his witness. To open my eyes and see. To open my ears and hear. And only then, to open my mouth and sing of what I have seen.

It might happen while I sit still. It might happen while I work. But it will never happen when I rush.

I want to remember that the person with the most important job of all was never in a hurry. Jesus knew there was time enough.

 

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(photo by yours truly)

 

“You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “that I am God.

Yes, and from ancient days I am he.”

(Isaiah 43:12-13)

Maplehurst

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